Spooked; a photo dump

Oct. 22nd, 2017 07:22 am
moonhare: (three hares)
[personal profile] moonhare
Trick of the light? Behind a cut due to size; work safe )

Fall Fashion

Oct. 22nd, 2017 07:21 am
moonhare: (Default)
[personal profile] moonhare
The deer have been visiting more frequently, even daring the wrath of The Huntress to graze in the front yard. Here they are yesterday sporting their lovely Autumn coats!


Why, Hello!


*stare*

There were three deer total, but the smaller of them was browsing leaves in the woods while I took these, and although she did come out, my picture of her didn't ;o) The larger deer in the first picture, the one on the left, could be the mom. She has had an awful limp for at least a year but she manages just fine.

Glub. 4am

Oct. 21st, 2017 08:42 pm
ranunculus: (Default)
[personal profile] ranunculus
 I am NOT a 4am kind of person.  
Still, at 4am yesterday morning I was being bright and cheerful and very prepared.  Sign In sheets, printed copies of the crew list ect.  We installed a small show in the Palace Hotel, operated it, then took it down and stuffed it back in the truck by 1:15 pm.  The nice things about this 10 hour work day were the hourly rate which was almost $10  above our normal rate (special contract for companies who refuse to sign a long term contract with us) AND the fact that it was all at double time.  The Union contract says that anytime we are forced to go to work before 6am (or after 12 midnight) that the employer has to pay us double time until we get a 9 hour break.  In this case the company didn't want to pay for an extra day for the hotel ballroom for our setup, and the event started at 7am.

Had a nice day with Donald today.  
 

typographer: Me on a car in the middle of nowhere, eastern Colorado, age four (Default)
[personal profile] typographer
A few weeks back I started this series (part 1, part 2, part 3) referencing a running gag from the movie Throw Mama From the Train, where one writer is hung up on his opening line, trying hundreds of variants of “The night was…” instead of just concentrating on the story itself, then fixing the opening later. The opening is important, of course. When your story is published, you won’t be there to whisper in the reader’s ear “It gets really good once it gets moving. Keep reading and scroll down. It’ll be worth it.” Your opening line (and paragraph, and scene) must do that for you.

The three classic openings are...

(the rest of this post about opening lines in fiction is at FontFolly.Net.)

Morse Overdrive...

Oct. 21st, 2017 07:04 pm
[syndicated profile] hrrunka_lj_feed
I did my best to keep the rest of Thursday relaxed., and took Friday morning slowly, too. A bit after 11am I left to catch a bus to Bromley, where I did a little shopping before heading to the pub down near Waitrose to meet Alice for lunch. It involved Singapore noodles and a lot of catch-up chat, and was very welcome. I went home via the shops, and then had a brief nap. My nephew arrived at about 3pm. After an early supper I headed out to spend the evening helping with a JOTA station at one of the local Scout huts. It was a good evening, but ran a little late. I'd expected this to be over well before 10pm, but I didn't get home 'til almost midnight.

This morning I was up early in order to drive up to Witham in deepest Essex for a day of intensive Morse code related activity. The late night last night and the early start this morning had left me slightly less alert than I'd have liked, but the drive was an easy one with no traffic hold-ups, and took less than an hour. I started off in a group of folk who were all far better at Morse than me, but at the first coffee break I found someone to swap with and moved into a less challenging group. Even so it was quite challenging and interesting enough to stretch me past my usual limits. I missed the opportunity to take an official Morse test, but I was struggling with receiving more than usual, so that was probably a merciful escape. By the time the day's formal activities were wrapped up at about 3pm I was thoroughly morsed out. Thankfully the drive home was almost as free of slow traffic as the drive up. I got home a bit before 5pm. I'm planning as quiet an evening as I can manage...

Morse Overdrive...

Oct. 21st, 2017 08:04 pm
hrrunka: A small radio transceiver (morse)
[personal profile] hrrunka
I did my best to keep the rest of Thursday relaxed., and took Friday morning slowly, too. A bit after 11am I left to catch a bus to Bromley, where I did a little shopping before heading to the pub down near Waitrose to meet Alice for lunch. It involved Singapore noodles and a lot of catch-up chat, and was very welcome. I went home via the shops, and then had a brief nap. My nephew arrived at about 3pm. After an early supper I headed out to spend the evening helping with a JOTA station at one of the local Scout huts. It was a good evening, but ran a little late. I'd expected this to be over well before 10pm, but I didn't get home 'til almost midnight.

This morning I was up early in order to drive up to Witham in deepest Essex for a day of intensive Morse code related activity. The late night last night and the early start this morning had left me slightly less alert than I'd have liked, but the drive was an easy one with no traffic hold-ups, and took less than an hour. I started off in a group of folk who were all far better at Morse than me, but at the first coffee break I found someone to swap with and moved into a less challenging group. Even so it was quite challenging and interesting enough to stretch me past my usual limits. I missed the opportunity to take an official Morse test, but I was struggling with receiving more than usual, so that was probably a merciful escape. By the time the day's formal activities were wrapped up at about 3pm I was thoroughly morsed out. Thankfully the drive home was almost as free of slow traffic as the drive up. I got home a bit before 5pm. I'm planning as quiet an evening as I can manage...

My tweets

Oct. 21st, 2017 06:00 pm
[syndicated profile] vrghr_lj_feed

Posted by Vargr

[syndicated profile] flayrah_feed

Posted by Sonious

Police!.pngNews out of Aliquippa, Pennsylvania from September announced that one Carl R. Rickwood was charged with 20 counts of dissemination of child pornography. It has recently been revealed that this perpetrator was actually a furry by the fandom name of R.C. Fox. A full breakdown of the documentation can be found on a video by Ragehound.

R.C has been a prolific member of the fandom, having his own fursuit since 2014, and also attending and volunteering for multiple conventions. They were also slated to run a disc jockey session at the upcoming Furpocalypse until this news was brought to staff's attention and they indicated they would not be in attendance. They were also featured in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette piece 'Meet the Furries'.

Since the news emerged, R.C.'s social media accounts on Twitter, Fur Affinity, and even YouTube have been removed, renamed, or disabled. As of now no arrest can be confirmed.

Sarajevo

Oct. 19th, 2017 07:53 pm
lupestripe: (Default)
[personal profile] lupestripe
Sarajevo is quite unlike any city to which I have ever been, largely because the old Ottoman part simply stops and the Austro-Hungarian part takes over. There's even a line on the pavement demarking the two zones, although it's pretty obvious where the deliniation is, as the Turkish area has buildings made of wood thrown along cobbled streets while the Austro-Hungarian side has wider boulevards with architecture that wouldn't look out of place in Vienna. The contrast is striking and a source of great fascination. We saw the change quite frequently as our hotel was literally on the street behind the main drag, meaning the city centre was a mere 200 yard walk away. In terms of location, I have rarely stayed anywhere better and the hotel served us incredibly well during our three-day time here.

On the Wednesday evening, we were looking for food, deciding to walk to the far edge of the centre some twenty minutes away. The plan was to go to a bar called The Brew Pub, the first independent craft brewery to open in Sarajevo. As we made our way down there, we saw a number of interesting sights, including the logo from the 1984 Winter Olympics which had been embossed on one of the paving slabs near the main square. It was incredible to think that less than eight years after this glorious event - one that had put the former Yugoslavia on the map - the city would be subject to a siege which would last over three years, destroying the vast majority of buildings and killing 13,952 people, including 5,434 civilians. Further down the street, in the Austro-Hungarian part of the city, we saw the poignant Eternal Flame, which was dedicated on 6 April 1946, the year anniversary of the liberation of Sarajevo from Nazi Germany. There is a dedication to this effect written in the colours of the Yugoslav flag in the stone behind the flame, which added further gravitas to the scene. The flickering flame in the still dark night gave the place an atmosphere that it certainly lacked during the day, and it was a pleasure to see this memorial in the hours of darkness.

Contrary to this, further down the main street there was a memorial which was far better in the sunshine. The Sarajevo Memorial for Children Killed during the Siege commemorates 521 children who died between 1992 and 1996 as a direct result of the military action in the city. Their names are engraved on the monument, which represents two dolphin fins made out of green glass shooting out of the water of a fountain. More names are expected to be added, but the way the sun glinted off the glass as it moved through the sky made this memorial a particularly touching one. None of this was seen in the dark of course, but we still had a quick look as we made our way further west.

Passing a former Red Cross hospital whose frontage had yet to be repaired (there was a picture of what the building looked like before the Bosnian War), we took a right up Kranjceviceva, where The Brew Pub was situated. We were concerned as the area was becoming increasingly residential, with high rise blocks of flats to our left. However, we needn't have worried as the road soon opened out and there was a small block of bars and restaurants on the right-hand side, one of which was our destination. The original idea had been to go to a restaurant called Bon Appetit, which the guidebook had told us was on the same street. Combining European cuisine and Bosnian hospitality, we thought it would be a good place to try, but alas when we got to where the place ought to have been, we couldn't find it (upon closer inspection, I realise it was behind the block of flats we had been staring straight at). This was a disappointment but we did spy an Italian restaurant called Trattoria Due right next door to The Brew Pub so for the want of a better option, this is where we ended up. It was worryingly quiet, with us being the only customers there, which made us feel we were intruding somewhat on a family gathering. A few more of the family turned up while we were eating but my quatro formaggi pizza was exceptional and the beer was fine, setting us up nicely for a trip to The Brew Pub. As we approached the darkened building, black against the night, we heard the sound of a singer inside. Fearing it would be uncomfortably loud, we resolved just to have a single beer, but once inside we managed to find a table and realised that the entertainment was very good. A single female acoustic guitarist, she was singing paired down versions of popular hits, and she was doing it very well. She was only two banks of tables away from us, but we really enjoyed the ambience of the place and ended up drinking the full range of beer they had. This turned out to be seven I think, all brewed on the premises. You can tell that craft brewing came a little late to this part of the world as the flavours are not as refined, but these were amongst the better brews we had on our trip and it was a pleasure sampling them. Furthermore, the staff were incredibly friendly and so we left two hours later feeling very happy indeed.

We decided to have a lie-in on Thursday morning, surfacing just before noon. The shower in the hotel was particularly good and soon we were back in the city centre, wandering around the Ottoman area. We decided to follow a walk detailed by the guidebook which promised to take in the main sights. This saw us head to the main square of Sebilj, known as Pigeon Square on account of the number of pigeons there (there were also vendors selling cups of corn for 1KM with which you could feed the birds), which was only a couple of blocks from our hotel. This square was the centre of life in the Ottoman city, from its foundation in the 1440s until its collapse in 1878. It was known as an area for craftsmen and indeed many of the old wooden shops remain, although the majority have now been converted into eateries and coffee shops (indeed Bosnia bases much of its national life around coffee). The square is dominated by the main public fountain, an octagonal wooden structure that perhaps should be grander than it actually is. To the east of Sebilj lies Mali Daire, a smaller square which is not too dissimilar to the gay area of Leeds with its lanterns hanging above coffee shops. This is a favourite place for young Sarajevans to congregate and its tranquility belies the fact its in the heart of a national capital.

The Ottoman part of Sarajevo is a great place to walk around as there are so many sights and smells to see. Just off Sebilj we saw coppersmiths working on Kazandziluk Street, with many tourist trinckets made from discarded shell cartridges left over at the War. In a way it makes sense as over one million projectiles pounded the city during the near four year siege, so reworking and recycling them to sell to tourists is a profitable venture. Sadly, although some of the coppersmithery does still happen in Sarajevo, a lot of the intricate designs are actually crafted in Turkey. Next to the marketplace was also Bascarsijska Dzamija, a huge mosque outside which there was a large sign advertising the multicultural nature of the city.

This was one of the mosques that dominated the skyline but it is not as important as the Gazi Husrev Begova Mosque, which is the most significant Islamic building in the country. We tried to look inside on three occasions but each time it was closed, with the sign detailing the opening hours clearly being wrong. Indeed, the sign outside the ticket office and the one outside the museum across the road advertised different times for the same things, which merely added to the confusion. Seriously, we tried to enter on the Thursday, Friday and even going down on the Saturday morning before our departure from the city but it was not open at any time. Originally built in 1530, the mosque is crafted in the Istanbul style, but has been through a history of ressurection and destruction throughout its life, namely in 1697, 1879 and 1993. The damage in the Bosnian War was not as extensive as it could have been and much of the oriental design survived. To one side of the Mosque there are two mausoleums, for Gazi Husrev-Bey and Murat Bey Tardi, with Husrev-Bey's being the bigger as it contains two stories. We only got to peer into the buildings but could see the tombs draped with a flag upon which Islamic text was written.

Opposite the Mosque is the longest continually functioning public toilet, having first been constructed in 1530 too. This whole area was a caravanserai, where traders and travellers could stay for up to three days free of charge. Most of the old caravanserai no longer survives and it took us having to explore around the back of one of the hotels for us to discover its ruins. Much of it has been excavated now and signs detail the orientation and how it looked in the past. This was something we discovered on the Friday evening in the pouring rain, again as we were just aimlessly wandering up and down the streets in the hope of seeing more sights. That's the delight of capital cities I guess. Near this was the six-domed museum known as the Brusa Bezistan which unfortunately we did not get the opportunity to see. However, we did get to see the part that was initially an oriental department store through which silks were traded. These days the shops are rather chintzy, selling tourist tat and little of interest, but just to be inside a beautiful stone building with so much history was an absolute privilege.

Our next stop was the newly reconstructed Gazi Husrev-beg Library, which had been initially founded by Gazi Husrev-beg in 1537. The building contains over 100,000 volumes of books and manuscripts in Arabic, Persian and Bosnian covering a vast range of topics. Just beyond this was the small passageway leading to the Jewish Quarter, which contained an interesting museum detailing the story of the Jews in the city. This was in the old Synagogue which they are slowly turning back into its original religious purpose, but right now it still acts as a museum. Many of the Jews in Sarajevo were expelled from Spain in the sixteenth century and they quickly became established as tradesmen in the Ottoman Empire. The museum details this history, passing through the two world wars and up to the present day, where the number of Jews has declined. There were only three of us in this small museum, with the other man seemingly following us around, which was somewhat unnerving. Still, we did manage to spend longer than intended in here, about an hour, as it was so fascinating.

We traversed into the Austro-Hungarian part of the city from here and were soon outside the grand Catholic Cathedral, which was completed in 1889. Outside this twin spired building there is a huge silver statue of Pope John Paul II, who led Mass here when he visited in 1997. The interior is dominated by pointed arches painted in yellow and dark red stripes, with a number of impressive stained glass windows. In all honesy though, I found the New Orthodox Serbian Church on the other side of the main square more to my taste. Completed in 1872 and thus slightly earlier than its Catholic contemporary, there is a breathtaking icon on the north wall painted by Paja Jovanovic. We were the only people in the Cathedral aside from the lady on the kiosk overseeing payment, which made the experience far more spiritual in a weird way. As is common with Orthodox cathedrals, there was gold everywhere and it provided a nice cool break from the pulsating heat of the lunchtime sun. The gold stars painted on a blue roof background were perhaps the highlight of the interior for me, but of course the icon itself was truly stunning.

The Church is sat on Trg Oslobodenja, one of the main squares of the city. Here we saw a group of older men playing street chess, with a crowd of about twenty watching on. From a kiosk, we also bought a drink of Sky Cola's equivalent of Fanta, which indeed was very similar to Coca Cola's equivalent. It was quite nice, but a bit drying and perhaps not worth the wait it took due to the person in front of us fannying about and not having their money ready before then just walking off without buying anything. The National Gallery of Bosnia and Herzegovina is also on this square, along with a metal globe-like statue containing a man surrounded by some birds. It was here that we had also seen the Sarajevo '84 embossment on the pavement.

Update

Oct. 19th, 2017 10:54 am
ranunculus: (Default)
[personal profile] ranunculus
 Worked 14 hours on the clock day before yesterday.  Didn't do much yesterday.  Today I'm caching up with chores, welcoming M back from Indiana and getting ready for tomorrow.  Tomorrow I have to be at work at 4am.....   Good money tho!!

Really Scary

Oct. 19th, 2017 10:00 am
ranunculus: (Default)
[personal profile] ranunculus
 75% less insects trapped in the last couple of years compared to 20 years ago.  
What a horrifying decline.  
http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/05/where-have-all-insects-gone

Another Day...

Oct. 19th, 2017 03:26 pm
[syndicated profile] hrrunka_lj_feed
Wednesday was a slow day, much needed. I did get a good start on a long-delayed task. A bit of sorting-out also got done, and I found and fixed a minor electronic problem. By the time the evening's radio club Net was over at 10pm I was ready for an early(-ish) night.

This morning's GB2CW Morse practice went about as well as last week's. After that, I got most of the rest of the sorting-out done, and put the electronic item I'd fixed the previous evening back together. After lunch, despite the light rain, I did a bit of hedge trimming so that the garden waste bin will be reasonably full for collection tomorrow. Other rubbish will need putting out later.

Another Day...

Oct. 19th, 2017 04:25 pm
hrrunka: My garden in the summer (garden)
[personal profile] hrrunka
Wednesday was a slow day, much needed. I did get a good start on a long-delayed task. A bit of sorting-out also got done, and I found and fixed a minor electronic problem. By the time the evening's radio club Net was over at 10pm I was ready for an early(-ish) night.

This morning's GB2CW Morse practice went about as well as last week's. After that, I got most of the rest of the sorting-out done, and put the electronic item I'd fixed the previous evening back together. After lunch, despite the light rain, I did a bit of hedge trimming so that the garden waste bin will be reasonably full for collection tomorrow. Other rubbish will need putting out later.

FursonaCon 2017

Oct. 19th, 2017 01:28 am
mortonfox: (chestnut halloween)
[personal profile] mortonfox
So this past weekend was my last furry convention of the year: FursonaCon at Holiday Inn in the Norfolk / Virginia Beach area. It's also the smallest one of the year, with only 297 attendees. (79 fursuiters in the fursuit parade) Funny thing is I think I enjoyed it the most of the four cons I attended this year. There wasn't much programming so that left plenty of time to relax, chat, and fursuit. The local furries are very hospitable. They didn't know me or where I was from ("Remind me again where Delaware is?" said one of them, probably half-jokingly.) but I was just short of dragged to a room party the first night of the con. Of course, with only a few hundred attendees, we didn't have the whole hotel to ourselves but the people from the two wedding parties we shared the hotel with were also very nice and wanted photos with all the fursuiters.

The fursuit games were run differently from other cons. Instead of having all the games as one long event, they split it into multiple short events, one game per event. I thought that was much less tiring. Plus, that meant each game had prizes. I didn't do so well in fursuit dodgeball, but my team won trophies in fursuit hockey. Because there weren't many fursuiters, the parade was short and quick and we got fish tags (for the Atlantis theme) at the end of it. One other benefit to a small con: there was never a wait at the photo room and so I got these wonderful lightstick photos.

Biggest downside though was the hotel. While some parts of the hotel were new and fairly up-to-date, my room wasn't. The faucet was loose. The power socket was loose. Lamp fixtures were rusty. The air conditioner was weak. Housekeeping on my floor lacked attention to detail. They forgot various items and even forgot to service my room the first day. Also there was a musty odor in the hotel corridors and some of the meeting rooms. On the plus side, my room had a refrigerator and microwave oven, which helped a lot because that meant I could buy some groceries and not have to contend with that ridiculous 12.6% restaurant tax in the Norfolk / Virginia Beach area.

What would the weekend be without GPS games? I found 6 geocaches on the trip. They were mostly very easy, even though two of them were rated 5 stars and one 3.5 stars. Surprisingly, the cache that took the most time to find was rated only 1 star. One of the 5-star caches was a pretend 5-star but aside from that, I'm not sure how difficulty ratings work any more. The star of the weekend though was Munzee. That area is packed with pins! On the evening of my arrival, I was up to 3,624 captures when I decided I'd better get back to the hotel! I got 290 more on Sunday evening and over a thousand more on the way home, but even then, it looks like I've barely scratched the surface.

The caches... )

Coffee and tea and the raining and me

Oct. 18th, 2017 08:27 pm
typographer: Me on a car in the middle of nowhere, eastern Colorado, age four (Default)
[personal profile] typographer
I drink coffee in the mornings and usually switch to tea in the afternoon. At least when I’m in the office. When I’m home (whether it be a work from home day or simply a day off), I’ll make a pot of coffee in the morning, and since I’m the only coffee drinker in the house, that’s usually more than enough for me for the day. Most of the time...

(The rest of this post about beverages, weather, life, and inspiration is at FontFolly.Net.)

Weird Skies...

Oct. 18th, 2017 09:45 am
[syndicated profile] hrrunka_lj_feed
On Monday morning I took the bus into Bromley to get some bits from Maplin. There is a nearer store but it's a short drive away, and it didn't have the bits I wanted in stock. I took the opportunity to look around the Apple store and then caught the bus home. The weather was showing strange signs of the storm over Ireland, with weird yellow clouds and less than clean air that was being blamed on a mix of Saharan dust and smoke from the wildfires in Portugal. My niece arrived shortly after 3pm, when the afternoon was at its most gloomy, having been somewhat delayed by Southeastern's train schedule chaos (caused by weekend engineering work over-running into the morning rush, and then trains breaking down or being halted for other reasons in a few critical locations). She'd been on a school trip, and was staying overnight with me prior to catching a flight to Kenya. I skipped the evening's informal radio club meeting, and we had a relaxed light supper.

Tuesday's alarm was set for 5am. My niece's flight needed her to get to Heathrow by about 9am at the latest, and as the M25 is usually involved I prefer to aim for something earlier. As it was, we left shortly after 6am, and the M25 was already showing signs of stress. I chose to skip the stretch from Sevenoaks to Godstone because it was doing car-park impressions. The journey took about two hours. My niece caught her flight, and I was home by 9:40am, having had a rather less troublesome drive back.

Yesterday evening there was a well-attended meeting at the nearer of my two local radio clubs. Numbers were swelled by folk from the Foundation class just ended and the class starting next Sunday. What they made of the various presentations I don't know. I tried to pitch my part of the evening at Foundation level, but may still have been over some of their heads. Still, it seemed to be an evening folk enjoyed, so all's good.

I've had a slow start this morning. There's only so much burning of both ends of the candle I can do...

Weird Skies...

Oct. 18th, 2017 10:45 am
hrrunka: The moon rising over the Hardy Inlet at Augusta on New Year's Eve (moonrise)
[personal profile] hrrunka
On Monday morning I took the bus into Bromley to get some bits from Maplin. There is a nearer store but it's a short drive away, and it didn't have the bits I wanted in stock. I took the opportunity to look around the Apple store and then caught the bus home. The weather was showing strange signs of the storm over Ireland, with weird yellow clouds and less than clean air that was being blamed on a mix of Saharan dust and smoke from the wildfires in Portugal. My niece arrived shortly after 3pm, when the afternoon was at its most gloomy, having been somewhat delayed by Southeastern's train schedule chaos (caused by weekend engineering work over-running into the morning rush, and then trains breaking down or being halted for other reasons in a few critical locations). She'd been on a school trip, and was staying overnight with me prior to catching a flight to Kenya. I skipped the evening's informal radio club meeting, and we had a relaxed light supper.

Tuesday's alarm was set for 5am. My niece's flight needed her to get to Heathrow by about 9am at the latest, and as the M25 is usually involved I prefer to aim for something earlier. As it was, we left shortly after 6am, and the M25 was already showing signs of stress. I chose to skip the stretch from Sevenoaks to Godstone because it was doing car-park impressions. The journey took about two hours. My niece caught her flight, and I was home by 9:40am, having had a rather less troublesome drive back.

Yesterday evening there was a well-attended meeting at the nearer of my two local radio clubs. Numbers were swelled by folk from the Foundation class just ended and the class starting next Sunday. What they made of the various presentations I don't know. I tried to pitch my part of the evening at Foundation level, but may still have been over some of their heads. Still, it seemed to be an evening folk enjoyed, so all's good.

I've had a slow start this morning. There's only so much burning of both ends of the candle I can do...

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